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Omicron may be less dangerous, Biden draws line with Putin: 5 Things podcast

Omicron may be less dangerous, Biden draws line with Putin: 5 Things podcast

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On today’s episode of the 5 Things podcast: Renters rights in the face of climate change and natural disasters

Housing and Economy reporter Swapna Venugopal Ramaswamy explains how they don’t have much protection. Plus, health reporter Elizabeth Weise updates us on omicron, opening statements are set in the trial of the police officer who killed Daunte Wright, President Joe Biden draws a clear line with Russian President Vladimir Putin and the Supreme Court will hear arguments related to school choice.

Podcasts:True crime, in-depth interviews and more USA TODAY podcasts right here.

Hit play on the player above to hear the podcast and follow along with the transcript below. This transcript was automatically generated, and then edited for clarity in its current form. There may be some differences between the audio and the text.

Taylor Wilson:

Good morning. I’m Taylor Wilson and this is 5 Things you need to know Wednesday, the 8th of December 2021. Today renter’s rights, plus more developments on omicron and more.

Here are some of the top headlines:

  1. 71% of Americans say they’re concerned about the omicron coronavirus variant, and an Axios-Ipsos poll also finds that most Americans don’t plan on canceling holiday travel because of it.
  2. One of Ghislaine Maxwell’s accusers testified yesterday that Maxwell sexually abused her when she was 14. The woman was the third witness to testify at the sex trafficking trial about being abused by Jeffrey Epstein in encounters organized by Maxwell.
  3. And Germany has a new chancellor. Angela Merkel’s tenure year of 16 years comes to an end today, with center-left Olaf Scholz being sworn in.

Taylor Wilson:

So many Americans live in their homes by renting, and as climate change increasingly brings a wave of new natural disasters and other challenges, tenants are wondering what their rights are. But as Housing and Economy reporter Swapna Venugopal tells us, they don’t have much protection.

Swapna Venugopal:

Most states don’t have any regulations requiring landlords to make flood related disclosures, for instance. But when it comes to home buyers, 29 states require flood risk disclosures in real estate transactions. So I spoke to a lot of different experts and laws vary by state, but most of them say that in case property is fully damaged, that is considered uninhabitable, tenants can ask to break their lease and get their security deposit back. For some, it might be within three weeks, it’s spelled out in the law. For others it might just say that it needs to be returned and really don’t specify a timeframe. And if there’s limited damage, you can still live in the apartment, and you are still able to live in the apartment, you might be able to ask for a reduction in rent.

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